Research press release

北極の地中における発熱

Nature Climate Change

Arctic heating from within

北極の土壌微生物が生み出す熱が永久凍土の融解と大気中への炭素の排出を促進している可能性についての報告が、今週掲載される。

気温が全球的に上昇し、永久凍土が融解しているため、土壌中の有機物質の分解が加速することが予測されているが、この分解によって熱が発生する過程については十分に解明されていない。

今回、Bo Elberlingたちは、グリーンランドの6地点で採取された21点の天然の有機質の永久凍土試料における微生物による熱発生を定量化し、微生物活動の活発化によって土壌分解速度に影響を与えるほどの熱が発生しているかについて調べた。Elberlingたちのモデルシミュレーションでは、土壌温度と炭素の分解の間にフィードバックループが生じており、これにより、2012年から2100年までの間に永久凍土の融解速度と微生物による熱発生速度が加速することが示された。

また、Elberlingたちは同様のプロセスによって、永久凍土に埋没している考古学上の特徴(有機質の貝塚)に保存された北極での初期人類の活動の証拠が失われてしまう可能性のあることも明らかにした。

Heat produced by Arctic soil microbes could enhance permafrost thaw and the release of carbon to the atmosphere, according to a paper published this week in Nature Climate Change.

As global temperatures rise and permafrost thaws, the breakdown of organic material in the soil is expected to accelerate. The process by which this decomposition produces heat is not well understood.

Bo Elberling and colleagues quantified microbial heat production in 21 samples of natural organic permafrost soils collected from six sites across Greenland to investigate whether enough heat can be produced by enhanced activity to affect the rate of soil decomposition. Their model simulations reveal a feedback loop between soil temperatures and carbon decomposition that could accelerate rates of permafrost thaw and microbial heat production between 2012 and 2100.

The authors also show that this process could degrade evidence of early human activity in the Arctic, preserved in organic middens - archaeological features buried in the permafrost.

doi: 10.1038/nclimate2590

「Nature 関連誌注目のハイライト」は、ネイチャー広報部門が報道関係者向けに作成したリリースを翻訳したものです。より正確かつ詳細な情報が必要な場合には、必ず原著論文をご覧ください。

メールマガジンリストの「Nature 関連誌今週のハイライト」にチェックをいれていただきますと、毎週最新のNature 関連誌のハイライトを皆様にお届けいたします。

「注目のハイライト」記事一覧へ戻る

プライバシーマーク制度