Research press release

【医学研究】サルを用いたHIV潜伏感染の治療薬開発研究

Nature

Medical research: Latent HIV infection targeted in monkeys

抗レトロウイルス療法を受けているアカゲザルに強力な抗体と免疫系刺激剤を併用投与すると、潜伏感染しているSHIVの量が減少したことを報告する論文が、今週掲載される。この方法は、抗レトロウイルス療法を受けた後のHIVの再出現を防止できる可能性がある。

抗レトロウイルス薬は、HIVの複製を阻止することでHIV感染の管理に役立つが、特定の細胞内に残存し、治療が中止された時に再出現する潜伏感染ウイルスの「隠れた」リザーバーを除去することはできない。抗レトロウイルス療法の中止後に広範囲中和抗体を投与すると、ウイルス量が減少することが明らかになっているが、この抗体を潜伏感染HIVリザーバーに送達できるかどうかは明らかでない。

今回、Dan Barouchたちの研究グループは、非ヒト霊長類に感染するHIV(SHIV)に感染し、抗レトロウイルス療法を受けている11匹のアカゲザルに、広範囲中和抗体と自然免疫系刺激剤を併用投与した。この自然免疫系刺激剤は、非感染免疫細胞とSHIVに感染した免疫細胞を活性化し、これにより抗体が除去すべきSHIV感染細胞を標的とすることができるようになる。これら11匹中6匹のアカゲザルには、抗レトロウイルス療法の中止から28週間後にウイルスリバウンドの徴候が見られた。これに対して、上述の併用治療を受けなかった対照群の11匹のアカゲザルは全例で、抗レトロウイルス療法の中止から平均21日でウイルスリバウンドが起こった。

なお、これらのアカゲザルは、SHIVに感染した直後に抗レトロウイルス療法を始めていたため、SHIVのリザーバーは小さく、その除去が比較的容易であった可能性がある。また、今回の研究でのモニタリング期間はわずか28週だったが、ヒトのHIVの場合にはリバウンドに最長2年かかっている。Barouchたちは、原理的には広範囲中和抗体の投与がヒトにおけるHIVの潜伏感染に対する有用な方法となる可能性があるが、さらに試験を実施する必要があると結論付けている。

A combination of a potent antibody and an immune system stimulant can reduce levels of latent HIV in rhesus monkeys undergoing antiretroviral therapy, reports a study published online this week in Nature. This strategy could prevent HIV re-emergence after antiretroviral therapy.

Antiretroviral drugs help manage HIV infections by preventing viral replication. However, they do not eliminate the ‘hidden’ reservoir of latent viruses that remains in certain cells and can re-emerge if treatment stops. Broadly neutralizing antibodies have been shown to reduce virus levels when they are administered following suspension of antiretroviral therapy. However, it was unknown whether antibodies could target latent HIV reservoirs.

Dan Barouch and colleagues administered a combination of a broadly neutralizing antibody and an innate immune system stimulator to 11 rhesus monkeys that were infected with a form of the virus that infects non-human primates and were undergoing antiretroviral therapy. The stimulator activated both uninfected immune cells and those harbouring the virus, allowing the antibody to flag the infected cells for elimination. The authors found that 6 of the 11 monkeys showed signs of viral rebound 28 weeks after antiretroviral treatment was suspended. The virus rebounded in all 11 monkeys in a control group that did not receive the combination treatment, in an average of 21 days.

The monkeys began antiretroviral therapy shortly after infection, so their viral reservoirs may have been small and relatively easy to eliminate. Additionally, they were only monitored for 28 weeks, whereas in humans HIV can take up to two years to rebound. The authors conclude that, in principle, broadly neutralizing antibodies could offer a useful strategy against latent HIV infection in humans, although further testing is required.

doi: 10.1038/s41586-018-0600-6|英語の原文

「Nature 関連誌注目のハイライト」は、ネイチャー広報部門が報道関係者向けに作成したリリースを翻訳したものです。より正確かつ詳細な情報が必要な場合には、必ず原著論文をご覧ください。

注目のハイライト

メールマガジンリストの「Nature 関連誌今週のハイライト」にチェックをいれていただきますと、毎週最新のNature 関連誌のハイライトを皆様にお届けいたします。

「注目のハイライト」記事一覧へ戻る

プライバシーマーク制度