Research press release

【微生物学】腸内微生物相による健康管理の仕組み

Nature

Microbiology: How gut microbiota might regulate health

腸内細菌が産生するN-アシルアミドという低分子有機化合物は、いろいろな受容体との相互作用によって人間の健康と生理機能に関与していることを示唆する研究論文が、今週掲載される。N-アシルアミドは、ヒトシグナル伝達分子の重要なクラスに分類され、免疫、行動、代謝などの生理機能のさまざまな側面に関係していると考えられてきた。

ヒトのマイクロバイオームは、生理機能と健康に重要な役割を果たすと考えられているが、その基盤となる機構についての解明は進んでいない。細菌は、低分子を使って周辺環境と相互作用するが、ヒトの微生物相も低分子を使ってヒト宿主と相互作用しているという仮説が提唱されている。しかし、それに関係している可能性のある分子の特定とその機能の仕方の解明はなされていない。

今回、Sean Bradyたちの研究グループは、ヒトの腸内細菌によって産生されるN-アシルアミドが5種類のヒトGタンパク質共役受容体(GPCR、一般的な薬剤標的である膜タンパク質ファミリーの1つ)と相互作用することを報告している。Bradyたちは、マウスと細胞のデータを解析して、こうした細菌の代謝産物がGPCR の一種であるGPR119を活性化させて、マウスの代謝ホルモンとグルコース恒常性を調節する能力を有することを明らかにした。今回の研究結果からは、微生物相によって産生される低分子が細菌のシグナル伝達分子を模倣でき、この模倣が将来的に糖尿病、肥満などの疾患の治療に利用できる方法となる可能性のあることが示唆されている。

Gut bacteria produce small organic compounds known as N-acyl amides that interact with receptors to mediate human health and physiology, research published online in Nature this week suggests. N-acyl amides are an important class of human signalling molecule that has been implicated in various aspects of physiology, including immunology, behaviour and metabolism.

Although the human microbiome is thought to have an important role in physiology and health, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Bacteria rely on small molecules to interact with their environment and it has been suggested that the human microbiota also uses small molecules to interact with its human host. However, the identity of the potential molecules involved and how they function has been unknown.

Sean Brady and colleagues report that human gut bacteria produce N-acyl amides that interact with five different human G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs; a family of membrane proteins that are common drug targets). The authors analyse mouse- and cell-based data and show that these bacterial metabolites activate a GPCR known as GPR119 and that they have the potential to regulate metabolic hormones and glucose homeostasis in mice. The findings suggest that small molecules produced by the microbiota can mimic bacterial signalling molecules, and that this mimicry may represent an avenue that could potentially be exploited in future therapeutic strategies for the treatment of diseases, such as diabetes and obesity.

doi: 10.1038/nature23874|英語の原文

「Nature 関連誌注目のハイライト」は、ネイチャー広報部門が報道関係者向けに作成したリリースを翻訳したものです。より正確かつ詳細な情報が必要な場合には、必ず原著論文をご覧ください。

注目のハイライト

メールマガジンリストの「Nature 関連誌今週のハイライト」にチェックをいれていただきますと、毎週最新のNature 関連誌のハイライトを皆様にお届けいたします。

「注目のハイライト」記事一覧へ戻る

プライバシーマーク制度