Research press release

「手付かず」の森林は暴力の歴史を覆い隠していた

Nature Ecology & Evolution

‘Untouched’ forests mask violent history

一見して人間の手が加えられていないエクアドルの雲霧林は、人間がその地を何世紀にもわたって占有していたが、その居住がヨーロッパの植民地主義によって16世紀に断絶したという歴史を覆い隠していることを明らかにした論文が、今週掲載される。

19世紀の旅行者たちは、同国キホスバレーの雲霧林を「人類がこれまで一度も住んだことがない」ようだと述べている。しかし、Nicholas Loughlinたちは、この谷にある湖の土壌コアを分析し、それが必ずしも正しくないことを明らかにした。彼らは、コアから木炭や菌類、花粉を発見し、その谷には500年以上にわたって人が住み、作物を栽培し、土器を作り、火を焚いたことを示したのである。

居住の証拠は1588年頃に途絶えていた。土壌中木炭は、ヨーロッパ人の侵攻後のこの地域での戦闘の歴史記録と同時期に、広範な火災が発生したことを示していた。Loughlinたちは、以降の堆積物中の多くを雑草の花粉が占めていることから、その地が放棄されたと考えている。1718年までには、雲霧林に特徴的な花粉を産出する種が取って代わったことから、19世紀のヨーロッパ人旅行者たちがその景観を未開の地と誤認した理由が説明される。

この研究から、植民地の拡大が先住民に与えた破滅的な影響が目に見える生態学的な側面を有していたこと、また、新熱帯区森林の人間による占有の証拠が急激な再生によって急速に覆い隠され得ることが示唆された。Loughlinたちは、環境回復活動のための歴史的基準を知るには古生態学的研究が必要であると述べている。

The seemingly pristine cloud forests of Ecuador hide a centuries - long history of human occupation - one cut short by European colonialism in the sixteenth century, reports a paper published online this week in Nature Ecology & Evolution.

Travellers in the nineteenth century remarked that the cloud forests of Ecuador's Quijos Valley appeared ‘unpeopled by the human race’. However, by examining soil cores from a lake within the valley, Nicholas Loughlin and colleagues found that this was not always true. The authors discovered charcoal, fungi and pollen in the cores, indicating that the valley was inhabited for more than 500 years by people cultivating crops, making pottery and burning fires.

Evidence for habitation ceases around 1588, with charcoal deposits that indicate there were widespread fires co-incident with historical records of open warfare in the region following European invasion. The authors believe that the site was abandoned after this, as indicated by the dominance of weed pollen in the sediments. By 1718, pollen species characteristic of cloud forests had taken over, explaining why the nineteenth century European travellers believed the landscape to be pristine.

The study suggests that the catastrophic impact of colonial expansion on indigenous peoples has a visible ecological dimension, and that evidence for human occupation of neo-tropical forests can be quickly obscured by rapid regrowth. Palaeoecological studies, the authors argue, are needed to inform historical baselines for environmental restoration efforts.

doi: 10.1038/s41559-018-0602-7

「Nature 関連誌注目のハイライト」は、ネイチャー広報部門が報道関係者向けに作成したリリースを翻訳したものです。より正確かつ詳細な情報が必要な場合には、必ず原著論文をご覧ください。

メールマガジンリストの「Nature 関連誌今週のハイライト」にチェックをいれていただきますと、毎週最新のNature 関連誌のハイライトを皆様にお届けいたします。

「注目のハイライト」記事一覧へ戻る

プライバシーマーク制度