Research press release

健康:孤独と社会的孤立が高齢者の転倒リスクを高める

Scientific Reports

Health: Loneliness and social isolation associated with higher risk of falls in elderly people

一人暮らしの高齢者や社会的接触のない高齢者は、自宅で転倒し、あるいは転倒して入院する確率が高いという研究結果を報告する論文がScientific Reports に掲載される。

今回、Daisy Fancourtたちは、ELSA(英国の老化に関する縦断研究)調査の一環として2002〜2017年に60歳以上の参加者1万3061人から収集したデータの研究を行った。今回の研究では、転倒に関する自己申告データの解析が行われ、転倒に関連した入院記録の分析も利用可能な記録について実施された。

転倒は、高齢者における大きな公衆衛生上の問題であり、今回の研究の参加者の50%以上が研究期間中に転倒したことを報告し、9%が転倒に関連した入院をしていた。社会的接触がほとんどないことと一人暮らしは、社会的孤立の指標として用いられ、(自己申告に基づく)高齢者が転倒するリスクと入院治療を要する転倒をするリスクが高くなることと関連していた。社会経済的要因とライフスタイル要因を計算に入れたところ、一人暮らしの研究参加者は、(自己申告に基づく)転倒のリスクが、友人や親族と同居している者より18%高いことが判明した。また、社会的接触が最も少ない者は、社会的接触が最も多い者よりも転倒を報告する確率が24%高く、転倒して入院する確率が36~42%高かった。

Fancourtたちは、同居人と暮らし、社会的接触を頻繁に行えば、ストレスが緩和されてリスクが特定されるようになることで、転倒リスクの低減を図れると提案している。今後の研究では、COVID-19のパンデミック(世界的大流行)の結果としてのロックダウンやソーシャルディスタンシング(人と人との物理的距離を保って接触機会を減らすこと)という措置のために高齢者の転倒件数が増えたかどうかを調べるべきだと、Fancourtたちは述べている。

Elderly people living alone or without social contact may be more likely to fall in their homes or be admitted to hospital for a fall, suggests a study published in Scientific Reports.

Daisy Fancourt and colleagues studied data from a total of 13,061 participants aged 60 and over, collected between 2002-2017 as part of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) survey. They analysed self-reported data on falls, and where available, records of hospital admissions related to a fall.

Falls are a major public health issue among older people, and over 50% of participants reported experiencing a fall within the study period, while 9% had a hospital admission related to a fall. Living alone and having little social contact, which were used as measures of social isolation, were associated with a higher risk of both self-reported falls and falls requiring hospital admittance in older adults. After accounting for socioeconomic and lifestyle factors, individuals living alone showed an 18% higher risk of reporting a fall than those living with a friend or relative. Individuals who had the least social contact were 24% more likely to report a fall and 36-42% more likely to be admitted to hospital for a fall than those with the most social contact.

The authors suggest that living with another person and frequent social contact may reduce the risk of falling by alleviating stress and allowing risks to be identified. Further studies should explore whether lockdown and social distancing measures as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic may have increased the incidence of falls in older individuals, according to the authors.

doi: 10.1038/s41598-020-77104-z

「Nature 関連誌注目のハイライト」は、ネイチャー広報部門が報道関係者向けに作成したリリースを翻訳したものです。より正確かつ詳細な情報が必要な場合には、必ず原著論文をご覧ください。

メールマガジンリストの「Nature 関連誌今週のハイライト」にチェックをいれていただきますと、毎週最新のNature 関連誌のハイライトを皆様にお届けいたします。

「注目のハイライト」記事一覧へ戻る

プライバシーマーク制度