Research press release

【古生物学】最も長く生き残っていたかもしれないオーストラリアの新種の翼竜

Scientific Reports

Palaeontology: New Australian pterosaur may have survived the longest

最近発見された化石が翼竜類の新種であり、チューロニアン期(9300万~9000万年前)まで生き残っていた可能性のあることを報告する論文が、今週掲載される。この化石には、頭蓋骨のいくつかの部分と5本の椎骨が含まれており、オーストラリアで発見された翼竜類の化石標本の中で最も完全な形を残している。今回の研究で得られた知見から、この化石が、アンハングエラ属の翼竜の後期の種と考えられることが示唆された。アンハングエラ属は、セノマニアン期(1億~9400万年前)の末期に絶滅したと考えられていた。

翼竜類に関する情報は、全ての大陸で発見された化石が基になっているが、翼竜類の骨は薄く、その内部は中空であるため、不完全で断片的な化石が多い。特にオーストラリアの翼竜類の化石記録が少なく、わずか20点の断片的な標本しか知られていない。

今回、Adele Pentlandたちの研究グループは、ウィントン層(オーストラリア・クイーンズランド州)で出土した化石が、翼竜類の新種であることを発見し、「Ferrodraco lentoni」と命名した。Ferroは、ラテン語のferrum(鉄)に由来し、鉄鉱石中に保存されていたことと関係しており、dracoはラテン語で竜を意味する。Pentlandたちは、顎(上顎頂、下顎頂、スパイク状の歯を含む)の形状と特徴に基づいて、これをアンハングエラ属の化石標本と同定した。アンハングエラ属に関する情報は、ブラジルの白亜紀前期のロムアルド層から出土した化石に依拠している。また、Ferrodracoと他のアンハングエラ属の翼竜類の比較によって、Ferrodracoの翼開長が約4メートルであることが示唆された。さらに、Pentlandたちは、Ferrodracoに独特な歯の特徴(例えば、前歯が小さいこと)があり、これによって他のアンハングエラ属の翼竜と区別できることも報告している。

この化石は2017年にウィントン層の一部で発見されたものだが、ウィントン層の形成は、チューロニアン期の前期まで続いたと考えられており、このことは、オーストラリアにいたアンハングエラ属の翼竜が他の地域よりも後の時代まで生き残っていた可能性があることを示唆している。

The discovery of a previously unknown species of pterosaur, which may have persisted as late as the Turonian period (90 - 93 million years ago), is reported in Scientific Reports this week. The fossil, which includes parts of the skull and five vertebrae, is the most complete pterosaur specimen ever found in Australia. The findings suggest it may be a late-surviving member of the Anhanguera genus of pterodactyls, which were believed to have gone extinct at the end of the Cenomanian period (100 - 94 million years ago).

Pterosaurs are known from fossils discovered on every continent but their remains are often incomplete and fragmentary because their bones are thin and hollow. The fossil record for pterosaurs in Australia is particularly sparse with only 20 known fragmentary specimens.

Adele Pentland and colleagues discovered the new pterosaur, which they have named Ferrodraco lentoni (from the Latin ferrum (iron), in reference to the ironstone preservation of the specimen, and the Latin draco (dragon)), in the Winton Formation of Queensland. Based on the shape and characteristics of its jaws, including crests on upper and lower jaw and spike-shaped teeth, the authors identified the specimen as belonging to the Anhanguera, which are known from the Early Cretaceous Romualdo Formation of Brazil. Comparison with other anhanguerian pterosaurs suggests that Ferrodraco’s wingspan measured approximately four metres. The authors also report a number of unique dental characteristics, including small front teeth, which distinguish Ferrodraco from other anhanguerians and identify it as a new species.

The fossil was discovered in 2017 in a part of the Winton Formation that may have formed as late as the early Turonian, which suggests that the anhanguerians may have survived later in Australia than elsewhere.

doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-49789-4

「Nature 関連誌注目のハイライト」は、ネイチャー広報部門が報道関係者向けに作成したリリースを翻訳したものです。より正確かつ詳細な情報が必要な場合には、必ず原著論文をご覧ください。

メールマガジンリストの「Nature 関連誌今週のハイライト」にチェックをいれていただきますと、毎週最新のNature 関連誌のハイライトを皆様にお届けいたします。

「注目のハイライト」記事一覧へ戻る

プライバシーマーク制度