Research press release

【地球科学】気候変動によってノルウェーのヴァイキング時代の遺物の分解が進むかもしれない

Scientific Reports

Earth science: Climate change may speed up degradation of Norse Viking Age remains

分解に対して非常に脆弱なノルウェーのヴァイキング時代の入植者の有機遺物(木材、骨、古DNAなど)は、今後の気候変動の影響のために、その存在が特に大きな危機にさらされるという見解を示した報告が、今週掲載される。

今回Jorgen Hollesenたちの研究グループは、北極域内の7か所の考古遺跡で22点の土壌試料を採取した。この試料には、グリーンランドの3つの主要な文化であるサッカック(紀元前2500~800年)、ドーセット(紀元前300年~紀元600年)、チューレ(紀元1300年以降)に由来する堆積物と、この地域に居住していたノルウェーのヴァイキング時代の入植者由来の堆積物が含まれる。有機堆積物は微生物による分解に対して非常に脆弱で、有機堆積物の分解には、土壌の温度と含水量が直接影響する。

Hollesenたちは、コンピュータモデルを用いて、いろいろな気候変動シナリオのシミュレーションや、気温と降水量(雨、雪、みぞれ)の変化と北極の土壌への影響を原因とする有機的遺物の喪失可能性のシミュレーションを行った。このモデルにより、地中に埋もれた考古学的遺物に含まれる有機炭素の30~70%が、今後80年以内に分解する可能性があることが示された。ノルウェーのヴァイキング時代の入植者の遺物が多数見つかっている北極の内陸部では、今後30年間に有機炭素の35%以上が失われる可能性がある。

北極域には18万か所以上の考古遺跡が登録されているため、最も脆弱な遺跡を見つけ出し、限られた保全用資源の分配を手助けする新しい方法が必要とされている。Hollesenたちは、この論文で示した方法が、気候変動に対して特に脆弱な遺跡の特定に役立つ可能性があると考えている。

Organic remains of Norse Viking Age settlers, such as wood, bone or ancient DNA, which are highly vulnerable to degradation, may be especially under threat from the effects of future climate change, according to a modelling study in Scientific Reports.

Jorgen Hollesen and colleagues collected 22 soil samples obtained from seven different archaeological sites across the Arctic. The samples contained deposits originating from the three main cultures of Greenland: Saqqaq (2,500 - 800 BC), Dorset (300 BC - 600 AD), and Thule (1,300 AD - present), as well as from Norse Viking Age settlers who inhabited the area. Organic deposits are highly vulnerable to degradation by microorganisms, which is directly affected by soil temperature and moisture content.

The authors used a computer model to simulate different climate change scenarios and the potential loss of organic artefacts due to changes in air temperature and precipitation rates (rainfall, snow and sleet) and their effect on Arctic soil. The model showed that 30 - 70% of the organic carbon contained in buried archaeological remains could degrade within the next 80 years. In the continental inland areas of the region, where many remains of the Norse Viking Age settlers are found, a possible loss of more than 35% of organic carbon could occur over the next 30 years.

With more than 180,000 archaeological sites registered in the Arctic, new methods are needed to detect the most vulnerable sites and help distribute limited conservation resources. The authors suggest that their method may help identify sites that are particularly vulnerable to climate change

doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-45200-4

「Nature 関連誌注目のハイライト」は、ネイチャー広報部門が報道関係者向けに作成したリリースを翻訳したものです。より正確かつ詳細な情報が必要な場合には、必ず原著論文をご覧ください。

メールマガジンリストの「Nature 関連誌今週のハイライト」にチェックをいれていただきますと、毎週最新のNature 関連誌のハイライトを皆様にお届けいたします。

「注目のハイライト」記事一覧へ戻る

プライバシーマーク制度