Research press release

【古生物学】ディプロドクス科恐竜のこれまでで最も小さな頭蓋骨から竜脚類恐竜の生活を解明する手掛かりが見つかる

Scientific Reports

Palaeontology: Smallest diplodocid dinosaur skull provides clues about sauropod life

ディプロドクス科恐竜(ブロントサウルスなどの首の長い草食恐竜)の幼若体は、食餌内容や身体的特徴が成体とは異なっており、親から離れて別の群れで生活していた可能性を示唆する論文が、今週掲載される。

今回D. Cary Woodruffたちの研究グループは、これまでに発見されたものの中で最も小さなディプロドクス科恐竜の頭蓋骨(全長約24センチメートル)を調べ、未成熟なディプロドクス科恐竜の知られざる側面を明らかにした。より大きな化石標本と比較すると、幼若体は単に成体を小型化したものではなく、自らの親(成体)よりも祖先に似た身体的特徴を有していたことが明らかになった。この現象は「反復発生」として知られる。幼若体の身体的特徴は、個体が成長するとともに、成体に見られるような、より進化した(派生した)状態に変化していった。

今回の研究で検討された幼若体の頭蓋骨と歯の独特な特徴は、ディプロドクス科恐竜の生活様式を解明する手掛かりとなる。成体の吻部が幅広くて四角いのに対し、幼若体の吻部は細く短いことから、幼若体の食餌には成体の食餌よりも多くの種類の植物物質が含まれていた可能性が示唆される。また、成体がより開放的な生息地の地面で限られた種類の食物を採餌していたのに対し、幼若体は森林で採餌していた可能性があるという。Woodruffたちは、こうした知見が、ディプロドクス科恐竜の親が仔の世話をせず、仔は、森林で年齢別の群れの中で生活していたとする学説を裏付ける証拠となるかもしれないと考えている。ディプロドクス科恐竜の孵化したての幼体と成体のサイズに極めて大きな差があることを考えると、親と仔が別れて生活したことで幼体が踏みつぶされないように保護され、また、幼若体の生息地が森林にあったことで捕食者からも守られていた可能性があるという考えを、Woodruffたちは示している。

Young diplodocid dinosaurs (long-necked herbivores such as the Brontosaurus) may have had different diets, shown different physical features, and lived in separate groups from their parents, a study in Scientific Reports suggests.

D. Cary Woodruff and colleagues examined the smallest diplodocid skull yet discovered - with a total cranial length of approximately 24cm - to reveal so far unknown aspects of immature diplodocid anatomy. Comparing the skull to other, larger specimens, the authors found that juveniles were not merely smaller versions of adults, but that they showed physical features that were more similar to those of their ancestors than those of their own, adult parents - a phenomenon known as recapitulation. As the dinosaurs grew, these features changed into the more recent (derived) states found in adults.

The unique features of the juvenile skull and teeth examined in the study provide insights into how diplodocid dinosaurs may have lived. The short, narrow snout suggests that the diet of juveniles may have included a wider variety of plant materials than that of adults, which had wide and squared snouts. The authors also suggest that juveniles may have fed in forests rather than in the more open habitats where adults browsed at ground level for their more specialist diets. They argue that the findings could provide evidence for the lack of parental care in diplodocid dinosaurs, whose offspring may have lived in forests as parts of age-segregated herds. Given the extreme size difference between hatchlings and adults, the separation of parents and offspring may have protected infants from being trampled while the juveniles’ forest habitat may also have shielded them from predators, the authors suggest.

doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-32620-x

「Nature 関連誌注目のハイライト」は、ネイチャー広報部門が報道関係者向けに作成したリリースを翻訳したものです。より正確かつ詳細な情報が必要な場合には、必ず原著論文をご覧ください。

メールマガジンリストの「Nature 関連誌今週のハイライト」にチェックをいれていただきますと、毎週最新のNature 関連誌のハイライトを皆様にお届けいたします。

「注目のハイライト」記事一覧へ戻る

プライバシーマーク制度