Research press release

友達作りで感化する

Nature Climate Change

Making friends and influencing people

カナダ国民を対象とした調査の結果をもとにした研究で、環境保護団体のメンバーと社会的なつながりのある人は、そうでない人と比べて、気候変動への取り組みにとって役立つ行動をとる心づもりをしている確率が高いことが明らかになった。その詳細を報告する論文が、今週掲載される。この新知見は、リスク認知の形成において社会的状況の果たす役割を明確に示している。

さまざまな問題に対する人々の考えや姿勢を予測する際に、それらの人々の社会的関係のネットワークと文化交流ネットワーク内での立ち位置を考慮に入れることが有益なことが分析研究によって明らかになっている。今回、David TindallとGeorgia Piggotは、2007年にカナダで実施された2つの調査によるデータを用いて、環境保護団体が人々の気候変動に対する考えと行動意欲にどのような影響を与えるのかを評価した。第1の調査は、無作為に選んだ非政府環境保護団体のメンバー1,227人に質問票を送り、その回答結果をまとめたもので、第2の調査では、カナダ国民1,007人を対象として、気候変動に対する考えと姿勢について電話による聞き取りが行われた。

TindallとPiggotは、環境保護団体のメンバーと数多く結びついている人は、結びついているメンバーの数が少ない人や結びつきのない人と比べて、自分の行動が環境に及ぼす影響を緩和する計画(例えば、燃費の良い車への買い替え、資源の再利用、住宅の断熱強化)をしている確率が高いことを明らかにした。なお、上記調査参加者の気候変動に対する懸念のレベルは、その社会的ネットワークに含まれる環境保護団体の数と関連していなかった。

以上の新知見は、環境保護団体が、環境保護運動に直接関与していない者(例えば、友人、隣人、同僚)との私的な対人相互作用を通じて世論の方向を誘導できることを示している。

Members of the Canadian general public with social ties to members of environmental organizations are more likely to have a plan of action to help tackle climate change, reports a paper published this week in Nature Climate Change. The findings emphasize the role of social context in shaping risk perception.

Analysis has shown that the positions of individuals within networks of social and cultural relations can be used to help predict beliefs and attitudes regarding a range of issues. David Tindall and Georgia Piggot assessed the influence of environmental organizations on peoples’ climate change beliefs and willingness to act using data from two surveys carried out in Canada in 2007. The first survey involved responses to questionnaires sent to 1,227 randomly selected members of environmental nongovernmental organizations. In a separate survey, 1,007 members of the Canadian general public were interviewed by telephone about their climate change beliefs and attitudes.

The authors found that individuals with a greater number of ties to environmental organization members were more likely to have plans to mitigate their impact on the environment - such as buying a more fuel-efficient car, recycling, and improving home insulation - than those with fewer or no such ties. Participants’ level of concern about climate change was not associated with the number of these organizations in their social networks.

The new findings show that environmental organizations can shape public opinion through informal interpersonal interaction with individuals not directly involved in the environmental movement, such as friends, neighbours, and colleagues.

doi: 10.1038/nclimate2597

「Nature 関連誌注目のハイライト」は、ネイチャー広報部門が報道関係者向けに作成したリリースを翻訳したものです。より正確かつ詳細な情報が必要な場合には、必ず原著論文をご覧ください。

メールマガジンリストの「Nature 関連誌今週のハイライト」にチェックをいれていただきますと、毎週最新のNature 関連誌のハイライトを皆様にお届けいたします。

「注目のハイライト」記事一覧へ戻る

プライバシーマーク制度