Volume 584 Issue 7820

Editorial

p.169

doi: 10.1038/d41586-020-02334-0

News

p.175

Researchers are redoubling efforts to understand links between biodiversity and emerging diseases — and use that information to predict and stop future outbreaks.

doi: 10.1038/d41586-020-02341-1

p.177

The US National Science Foundation’s new focus on computer science could also put already-under-represented groups at a disadvantage, critics say.

doi: 10.1038/d41586-020-02272-x

p.178

Pioneering guidelines aren’t enough to prevent overseas militaries such as China’s from co-opting the country’s science, say some experts.

doi: 10.1038/d41586-020-02188-6

p.180

doi: 10.1038/d41586-020-02314-4

News Features

p.182

doi: 10.1038/d41586-020-02337-x

News & Views

p.193

Molecules have previously been made that induce protein destruction inside cells. A new class of molecule now induces the degradation of membrane and extracellular proteins — opening up avenues for drug discovery.

doi: 10.1038/d41586-020-02211-w

p.194

Does the loss of species through habitat decline follow the same pattern whether the area lost is part of a large or a small habitat? An analysis sheds light on this long-running debate, with its implications for conservation strategies.

doi: 10.1038/d41586-020-02210-x

p.196

Stretching the skin of mice reveals that mechanical strain is communicated by a subpopulation of stem cells that proliferate and promote mechanical resistance, and so generate extra skin.

doi: 10.1038/d41586-020-02158-y

p.198

doi: 10.1038/d41586-020-02266-9

Articles